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PAV and YOU - Civil Defence Guide (Document No. 2)

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Righty, the second document in my series is here - this is a document based on the famous/infamous civil defence document/video series (neither of which were officially released but can be found online/YouTube) "Protect and Survive" which outlined what to do in the event of nuclear war.

This document was previously referenced in my first document (30th July 1993 - Day 15)

"The creation of the civil defence document "PAV AND YOU" (based on the Protect and Survive documentation from the early 1980's) begins, national publication and distribution are assumed to be possible within two weeks."

This document was never released. As such, only "Version 1" was created which is seen here.

(There are some images to include, but I'm having issues uploading them, size is the issue, so I'm having to compress them. They shouldn't be affected much, they're pretty "basic" by all standards as they are only a "first draft." And no points will be awarded to anybody who figures out who drew these abominations... hint: it was me.)


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*** DO NOT DISTRIBUTE * NOT FOR PUBLIC RELEASE ***
 

PAV AND YOU
Civil Defense Guide
Version 1

 

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This booklet tells you and your family how to make your home as safe as possible in the event of a PAV outbreak in your community.

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You are strongly advised to heed all advice in this booklet, your and the lives of your family members may depend on it.

Keep this booklet close to hand.

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Chapter 1: 

Essential Information - PAV

Chapter 2:

Preparing Your Domicile
Survival Kits - Essentials For Your Refuge
Casualties & Personal Safety
Additional Tips To Remember

Chapter 3:

The Authorities
What Is Expected of You?
"Carrying On", life after PAV

 

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Chapter 1: Essential Information - PAV

 

PAV or "Post-Expiry Ambulation Virus" is a virus which due to presently unknown phenomena causes the "resurrection", "ambulation" or "reanimation" of those who have previously contracted the virus and died. In short, it causes the recently deceased who have been infected with PAV prior to death to "come back to life." 

 

This is important for you to know as everybody who is infected with PAV and dies who is not dealt with correctly as outlined later in this document will be immediately hostile, regardless of previous relationships, personal convictions, moral beliefs or other personality traits which would typically indicate passivity.

 

While this may be a distressing notion and one you may wish to dismiss, it has been verified that this phenomenon is occurring and it is strongly recommended you accept this. Failure to do so may put your life and the lives of your family members at risk.

 

It has been identified that the following methods of infection are applicable to PAV.

 

  • Contact (biting, scratches)
  • Blood-borne (Sharing used needles, getting infected blood/bodily fluids in open wounds)
  • Airborne (Breathing in infected matter from an infected person(s) coughing & sneezing)
  • Via Mucous Membrane (infected bodily fluids getting into eyes, the nose, mouth etc)
  • Sexual Transmission (Unprotected sex resulting in infection)

 

As such, it is strongly recommended that the following methods be applied to prevent infecting others or yourself.

 

  • Cough and sneeze into tissues, dispose of the tissues and wash your hands as soon as possible, if flu symptoms persist and worsen over 24 hours, avoid going out in public and contact your GP as soon as possible.
  • Refrain from sharing needles and cover open wounds.
  • If you are bleeding, try to stop the source of the bleeding and wash away the blood as soon as possible, avoid getting it on other people.
  • If somebody else is bleeding, avoid getting the blood on you, wear latex gloves if you need to touch them and wash your hands after contact.
  • Avoid having unprotected sex.
  • Avoid person(s) that appear confused, agitated, "drunk" or are otherwise deceased/unconscious unless absolutely necessary.

 

In the event you feel you, a loved one, or somebody you know in the community may be infected with PAV, the progression of the virus is outlined below, typically most people will present the symptoms outlined in a linear fashion allowing easy identification and action.

 

24 Hours:

 

Typical cold and flu-like symptoms will appear, these include a runny nose, fever, headaches, aches and pains and nausea.

 

34 Hours:

 

Previous symptoms will become worse, new symptoms will include lethargy, anxiety, confusion, vomiting and diarrhoea.

 

48-72 Hours:

 

Previous symptoms will become worse, new symptoms will include paranoia, depression, delirium, bloody stool, bloody vomit, coughing up blood, bleeding from the eyes, nosebleeds and muscle cramping.

 

In addition to the above, within 72 hours, the person showing the above symptoms will likely proceed to fall unconscious and die shortly thereafter.

 

One Hour Post Death:

 

At least an hour after having died, the infected individual will proceed to "reactivate", "reanimate" or "ambulate", at this point the individual will become extremely aggressive and will attempt to attack all nearby person(s).

 

Outside of the aforementioned aggressive nature, they will also appear to be significantly lacking in abilities to coordinate and will likely take on traits most commonly associated with those who are drunk or suffering from severe brain damage, most notably trouble walking, poor communication skills and difficulty with complex tasks.

 

At present, the only way to prevent an individual infected with PAV from "ambulating" after death is to destroy or damage the brain, this can be carried out in a multitude of ways - examples of these and how to carry this out will be outlined later in this document.

 

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Chapter 2: Preparing Your Domicile

 

In the event your local area is affected, you are recommended to stay at home, your local authority is best situated to help you. Unless you have relatives or a place of your own to go to, moving to a new area will likely result in the local authority of your new area refusing to provide food, accommodation (if required due to unforeseen/changing circumstances) or other essentials. In addition to this, your local authority may use your now empty home to house others - so it is recommended to stay at home.

 

Your first priority should be to provide yourself with a safe, comfortable location in which to wait for your local authorities to resolve the situation. As such you will need to prepare your home.

 

Firstly determine what kind of property you are living in, this will determine the next course of action you will need to take.

 

Semi/Detached 2+ Story Home

 

If you are occupying a semi or detached home with two or more floors the following information is relevant to you.

 

Lock all windows and doors on the ground floor and all windows and doors on the second/higher floors which are directly accessible from the ground floor by external stairs or earthworks.

 

Proceed to close all curtains on the first floor and cover any windows without curtains with makeshift coverings (bedsheets or taped/tacked on newspapers/tarp will be satisfactory for this task.) Once this is complete, cover all doors which have glass or acrylic panels which face to the exterior of the property in a similar fashion.

 

It is recommended that you board up windows and doors where possible on the ground floor and at points on the second floor where access is possible from the ground floor. If you are unable to do this, moving heavy furniture, boxes of books, sand, earth or other heavy objects such as concrete blocks, stacks of bricks or piled up timber/logs against doors and windows will suffice.

 

Once you have secured the property, you are then recommended to move to the highest available floor and begin closing all curtains/put up impromptu curtains where required. 

 

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Multistory Residential Buildings (Apartment Blocks, Tenement Buildings etc.)

 

If you are occupying an apartment building, tenement building or other multistory residential structure with two or more floors the following information is relevant to you.

 

Lock all windows and doors on the ground floor and all windows and doors on the second/higher floors which are directly accessible from the ground floor by external stairs or earthworks.

 

Ensure elevators (where operational) are brought to the highest available floor of occupancy and that power to them is shut off as so they can no longer be called from any alternate floor.

 

Ensure service access (such as window washing units which are able to reach the ground floor) are brought to the highest available floor and that power to them is shut off as so they can no longer be used unless operated from the floor they occupy.

 

Proceed to close all curtains on the first floor and cover any windows without curtains with makeshift coverings (bedsheets or taped/tacked on newspapers/tarp will be satisfactory for this task.) Once this is complete, cover all doors which have glass or acrylic panels which face to the exterior of the property in a similar fashion.

 

It is recommended that you board up windows and doors where possible on the ground floor and at points on the second floor where access is possible from the ground floor. If you are unable to do this, moving heavy furniture, boxes of books, sand, earth or other heavy objects such as concrete blocks, stacks of bricks or piled up timber/logs against doors and windows will suffice.

 

It is also recommended that stairwells, both emergency and primary are locked and barricaded. Special care should be taken to ensure that flats with access to two floors (e.g. "penthouses", "scissor section flats" "two-story flats/apartments") are adequately secured to ensure secured access points cannot be bypassed by simply navigating through a "scissor section flat" or another derivative that is connected to two floors.

 

Once you have secured the property, you are then recommended to move to the highest available floor and begin closing all curtains/put up impromptu curtains/coverings where required. 

 

5ba8cc13a38d8_MultistoryResidentialTowerBlockTypeBuilding-LABELED-V.1.-DRAFT-min-min.thumb.png.e6a77ec91d944a7fe6cac2693d10c563.png

 

Bungalow or Other Single Story Dwelling

 

 

If you are occupying a single story dwelling such as a bungalow, the following information is relevant to you.

 

Lock all windows and doors. Ensure all curtains are closed and that windows or glass/acrylic panels in doors without curtains are adequately covered with alternate materials. Materials which are adequate for this task if curtains are not readily available and installed include bedsheets, newspaper and tarp, all of which can be taped or tacked over windows and other openings.

 

You are strongly encouraged to board up exterior windows and doors where possible. If you are unable to do this, moving heavy furniture, boxes of books, sand, earth or other heavy objects such as concrete blocks, stacks of bricks or piled up timber/logs against doors and windows will also suffice.

 

(If safe access is possible, occupy the loft/attic space over ground floor rooms. This should only be attempted if suitable flooring exists and ventilation can be provided (e.g. a window) otherwise you may become overwhelmed by heat exhaustion or otherwise injure yourself while occupying this space.)

 

5ba8cc1a2ec6a_SingleStoryHouse-LABELED-V.1-DRAFT-min-min.thumb.png.711bf21a8471fefa96b314c20f9ac91b.png

 

Caravan's or Other "Temporary" Dwellings

 

These locations are wholly inadequate and you are strongly encouraged to leave this form of dwelling and relocate to a stronger structure if possible or alternatively contact your local authorities who will rehome you.

 

All Dwelling Types

 

The following advice is applicable to ALL dwellings, with exception to caravans or "temporary" dwellings as outlined above.

 

Once you have carried out the relevant tasks for your residency type, locate the most central room possible and designate this the main room you will occupy. This is to prevent noise leakage from typical, day to day activities such as listening to the radio, TV, snoring, eating and cooking. The main aim here is to prevent people outside from being aware of your presence inside, at least until you wish to be found.

 

To assist with dampening sound, you can erect soundproofing on the exterior walls (where possible) and internal walls of your room. This can be achieved through the use of foam, insulation, carpeting or the use of duvets attached to the walls. In addition to this, minimise sound being able to travel outside by keeping windows and internal doors closed and covering all gaps and vents with muffling material.

 

Chapter 2: Survival Kits - Essentials For Your Refuge

 

1. Water

 

Following securing all access points, it is imperative that you begin collecting water. To do this locate any clean containers such as bottles, tubs, pans, pots, cups, bowls, the bath, the kitchen and bathroom sink, the toilet along with any other containers which are suitably clean and capable of holding and retaining water.

 

2. Food

 

It is recommended you stock enough food for fourteen days (two weeks), as to avoid shortages in your supplies you are advised to avoid perishable foods as far as possible and store foods which can be eaten cold, do not require refrigeration and are of a varied nature to prevent boredom.

 

Good examples of foods to store would be:

 

  • Canned, precooked vegetables.
  • Canned fruit.
  • Canned, pre-cooked meats.
  • Jams, chutney, marmalade, peanut butter, honey, yeast extract (marmite/vegemite etc.), chocolate spreads, fruit and vegetable sauces.
  • Cereals, biscuits, chocolates and cakes.
  • Canned soup.
  • Dried or salted meat or fish.
  • Dried fruit, vegetables or mushrooms.
  • Powdered or tinned milk.

 

If you have young babies/toddlers or person(s) unable to eat solid foods it is strongly recommended you also seek out their required food-sources and stock up on these separately in addition to the above.

 

In all instances, you are strongly recommended to eat all perishable food first, utilise preserved and non-perishable foods only after all perishable foods have been used or are unfit for consumption.

 

3. Portable Radio and Spare Batteries

 

Take a portable radio with you into your refuge, include spare batteries if you have any. Alternately you could use a hand-wound radio or if you have access to one, a crystal radio.

 

4. Crockery & Kitchen Utensils

 

Ensure you take required crockery (plates, bowls, cups/mugs, knives, forks, a tin opener, a sharp knife and a pair of scissors) with you into your refuge.

 

5. Clothing

 

As your property may be without heat for a period of time, make sure to include a set of warm clothing for each member of your refuge. Gloves, scarfs, hats, coats and jumpers are good items to take with you.

 

6. Sanitation Items

 

As there will be no water to spare for the purposes of sanitation, you will need to make special arrangements for this.

 

As such you must keep the following items in your safe room.

 

A container such as a plastic bucket fitted with a cover, plastic bin liners to line the container and allow you to isolate the waste away from the bucket, strong disinfectant, toilet paper and preferably an improvised seat with the based removed which allows for sitting over the aforementioned bucket.

 

7. Additional items

 

It is recommended that you take the following extra items with you into your refuge.

 

  • Bedding and/or sleeping bags.
  • A portable stove, fuel and saucepans.
  • Torches with spare batteries, candles, matches and a lighter.
  • A table and chairs.
  • Buckets, toilet rolls, plastic bags, toothpaste, toothbrushes and sanitary towels.
  • A change of clothing for every person in the refuge.
  • A First Aid kit, prescribed medication, disinfectant, painkillers (paracetamol, aspirin etc.), adhesive dressings, bandages, ointments and any spare prescription spectacles available for those requiring them.
  • Brushes, shovels and a dustpan.
  • Tissues and a box of dry sand for cleaning plates and utensils.
  • Paper/notebook and pens or pencils for writing notes and messages.
  • Books, board games, toys and other readily accessible sources of entertainment.
  • A calendar and a mechanical clock.
  • This booklet.

 

Chapter 2: Casualties & Personal Safety

 

While occupying your refuge, you may end up with casualties from exposure to PAV or due to encountering person(s) infected with PAV. If this occurs you must determine the correct course of action depending on the circumstances.

 

If a family member has contracted PAV and has progressed to the final and terminal stage before you can take them to your local medical clinic or hospital, you must take action to prevent ambulation of the person following their expiry, this is for your own and your families protection.

 

Unless you are a medical professional, CPR should NOT be carried out.

 

As to prevent ambulation you must locate a suitable implement capable of penetrating the skull and damaging the brain. Suitable implements for carrying this procedure out include screwdrivers, sharp pointed knives, drills etc. Alternately the use of blunt force trauma or firearms will suffice as suitable alternatives.

 

To minimise cross-contamination during this procedure, the use of gloves and material covering the mouth and nose is recommended.

 

Damage to the brain must be inflicted within several minutes of the expiry of a person infected with PAV. If you are using a sharp, piercing implement, apply force to the temple, enough to ensure the implement pierces the skull and embeds itself within the brain. If you lack the strength to breach the skull, a hammer can be used to assist you in "tapping" the object through the skull and into the brain.

 

If you are using a firearm or a blunt-object, similar processes apply, it is advised however that if you are forced to use a firearm or a blunt object that this is carried out in a well-ventilated area to prevent possible infection via aerosolised bodily tissue/fluids and to reduce contamination of the refuge.

 

If your refuge is attacked by a person or person(s) infected with PAV, it is recommended that you contact 999 and request police assistance. In the event you are unable to receive police assistance and cannot escape to a safer location, the use of force is an option available to you.

 

As with the previous advice, an assailant infected with PAV can be stopped by damaging the brain. Due to the dangerous nature of person(s) infected with late-stage PAV, any person that has been left to ambulate should be terminated at a distance.

 

The use of a long-handled blunt force implement is recommended. The use of a spade/shovel, cricket/baseball bat, hockey stick, axe or another tool with a long handle and solid wooden or metal head is suggested.

 

If you do not have any of the above available, heavy objects such as bricks which can be thrown can be utilised. Alternately a firearm can be used.

 

If you do not have access to a long-handled, heavy object, heavy throwable objects or a firearm you may also attempt to disable the attacker in close quarters with a hammer, crowbar, hatchet, knife, screwdriver or similar implement. This should generally be seen as a last resort, as you increase your risk of PAV infection exponentially the closer you are to a person who has transitioned into late-stage PAV.

 

As was previously mentioned, the use of face coverings while carrying out this task is recommended. Failure to do so could result in infection by PAV.

 

Following the prevention of ambulation or termination of an attacker, the body must be prepared for storage. This should be done by covering the body as securely as possible, restraining the feet (with the use of twine, rope, zip ties etc.) before attaching identification (where this is possible) and moving the body outside of the building.

 

You should receive instructions over the radio, TV or from your local authority on what to do with the body in your area. If no instructions are received within five days and you are unable to contact your local authorities, you should temporarily bury the body and mark the spot where the burial occurred.

 

Chapter 2: Additional Tips To Remember

 

Conserve as much water as you can. Water is life. Re-use water for as many different purposes as possible and avoid waste. Use as little water as possible while cooking, pierce the top of cans of food needing to be cooked and place the can in a saucepan of water, heating the water will cook the food and allow the water to be used several times without needing to clean the pan. Used utensils can be cleaned by holding or placing them in the same hot water.

 

Keep your lavatory waste separate from other rubbish, keep all waste as far away from your water and food as possible. Ensure you keep your hands as clean as possible.

 

Listen to your radio and/or TV for announcements, you may miss vital information if you do not heed this advice.

 

Keep a low profile, try not to attract attention - person(s) affected by PAV are attracted by movement and sound, thus if you maintain a low profile you are less likely to encounter and have to deal with possible infection by person(s) infected with PAV.

 

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Chapter 3: The Authorities

 

During this time the authorities may be occupied and unable to immediately assist. As such the following information is relevant to you.

 

Remain within your refuge unless explicitly instructed to leave or evacuate by your local authority or your refuge becomes unsuitable for continued habitation.

 

In the event of an emergency (fire, medical emergency or other threat to your life or property) dial 999 and request the relevant authority. You may find yourself having to wait. If this occurs be patient and await further instruction by the operator.

 

If you are unable to reach the emergency services by telephone, you are recommended to remain within your refuge unless remaining within your refuge would endanger your life or the life of others within your refuge. You should remain inside until such times as you receive the all-clear to go outside. Once you receive the all-clear, it is then recommended to seek assistance as required. Alternately, if you must leave, locate your nearest police station, police or military checkpoint and advise them of your situation - they will be able to assist you further from there.

 

Chapter 3: What Is Expected of You?

 

In the event your location is unsafe due to PAV presence, keeping yourself and your family safe should be your utmost priority, remain off the streets and follow the advice in this booklet, on the radio, television and provided by your local authority.

 

If your area is currently free of PAV presence, you are recommended to maintain as normal a routine as possible, if this is not possible (due to workplaces being closed, lack of transportation etc.) you may be able to volunteer your services to your local authority.

 

If you are a former police officer, fire officer, have medical training, civil defence training, military, prison or security training, are capable of driving HGV's, coaches or are fit and able and willing to help your community prepare, you can always provide your assistance and services to your local authority. This can be done by signing up for volunteer services at your local police station, army barracks, TA centre, hospital, medical clinic, community refuge centre or council offices.

 

Chapter 3: "Carrying On", Life After PAV

 

Given the extraneous circumstances, it is possible that during the course of this event you or your family members may suffer mental trauma, in the event you or a member of your family experience the following symptoms, speak to your local GP who will be able to assist you further.

 

The following are a list of physical and mental symptoms indicative of mental trauma. If any of these symptoms develop within yourself or a family member/friend you are strongly recommended to seek help/request the person seek help from their GP. There is no shame in this, your emotional needs are as important as your physical needs and should not be ignored, especially in this time of crisis.

 

Symptoms: Unwanted, upsetting memories. Nightmares. Flashbacks. Feelings of guilt. Avoidance of places, people or topics which remind you of previous traumatic events. Irritability. Difficulty sleeping. Physical sensations with no obvious cause (e.g. pain, sweating, trembling.) Feeling "on-edge". Increased awareness of threats. Headaches. Nausea. Chest pain, Bed wetting (primarily in children.) Difficulty concentrating. Drug or alcohol abuse. Self-harm. Anxiety. Depression. Suicidal thoughts. Emotional outbursts. Confusion. Inability or difficulty making decisions.

 

If you are not presently experiencing physical or mental difficulties you are recommended to register with your local authority to assist within your area. This is particularly important if you have previous medical training, are trained in a trade or have a vocational education or are otherwise not shy of a little elbow grease, are of good health and have the will to get things back on track. Your service will be of great help and together we will make Britain great and more importantly, safe again.

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7 minutes ago, sharkstertheshark said:

Have you ever thought about writing literature for a mod?

Eh, like a modification or a moderator?

For the former, not sure there really are any "literature" mods per-say. Could be wrong, but haven't seen any.
For the latter, not sure I've really given it much of a thought, I would give it a go, just not sure precisely what on earth I'd be able to write.

I mean, I've been working on some radio stuff using WordZed, I guess that technically counts as a modification. Outside of that, no modification writing planned here currently.

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3 hours ago, MaxZorin44456 said:

Eh, like a modification or a moderator?

For the former, not sure there really are any "literature" mods per-say. Could be wrong, but haven't seen any.
For the latter, not sure I've really given it much of a thought, I would give it a go, just not sure precisely what on earth I'd be able to write.

I mean, I've been working on some radio stuff using WordZed, I guess that technically counts as a modification. Outside of that, no modification writing planned here currently.

You can use the map interface as a framework. Instead of a map it just has a sheet with text on it.

 

There's some proof of concepts here.

 

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15 hours ago, sharkstertheshark said:

You can use the map interface as a framework. Instead of a map it just has a sheet with text on it.

 

There's some proof of concepts here.

 

That seems interesting. I'll keep my eye on it.

I'm certainly aware of the fact that notes exist in the game. You can write them in game, not so sure as to if they could be created and "imported" via a mod in the workshop, however.

I'm planning on doing some VHS tapes/Cassettes whenever/if ever they decide to release that.

Although it will probably be a mix of lore and random stuff like the transcripts of the moon landings and weird home videos.

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