In the Cold Kentucky... Fog
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As mentioned in the Thursdoid, we're implementing fog and mist - and we're going to try to strike a balance between 'real' and 'good for gameplay'.

 

As such we're looking at fog stats for Kentucky, but they're fairly tricky to get to grips with.

 

In general it seems that fog/mist can be a fairly year round affair in our chosen area - occurring just as much in summer as it does winter. The only main difference being that the morning fog will burn off way quicker in the summer months.

 

I was wondering if any Followers of Spiffo from this part of the world could fill us in on any anecdotal evidence and experience?

 

I remember what fogs and mists were like back when I lived in North Carolina, but Kentucky is pretty far distant in geographic terms...

 

 

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I don't know much about Kentucky fog, but it would be most likely that fog would thicken near bodies of water and last longer in places with greater shade. Perhaps the fog would last for longer and achieve greater thickness near the river and some of the lakes/ponds. Also, fog may last longer in the woods where the trees provide natural shade. 

 

 

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Well, a couple states over here in Missouri... the fog tends to be thick in the river valleys, but burns off in the first couple hours of the day if it is warm. Stays around a bit in the later months when it is colder, but not usually later than noonish.  Sometimes the fog will roll in at night but not too often.  Mornings can get a bit misty in the more hilly parts of the area in valleys and such. 

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why not ask the local weather station per email? or something like "Kentucky weather Center" http://kyweathercenter.com/ ? 

 

I would just write them a mail and maybe you are lucky and they send you weather statistics?

 

other than that, for Louisville/KY I found these https://www.timeanddate.com/weather/usa/louisville/historic?month=9&year=2009  for 2009-2017 ... at least you can see how often and how long it was foggy.

 

 

Edited by King-Salomon

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I live in WV, one state over from Kentucky but in weather terms I think we're pretty similar.

 

I mostly notice fog after a heavy rain or on cooler mornings. I think it gets thicker during the colder months but certainly after a summer rain too. It tends to stick around on cloudy days when the sun isn't there to burn it off, like you said. Mostly I notice it during my late night drives home after work, the fog gets pretty thick the further you get into wooded areas where the wind can't blow it away.

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I feel the snow effect is back to front. As you zoom out the snow should have a greater effect on visibility. Whereas in the clip it seemed that the snow got thicker as you zoomed in. 

 

So in snowy conditions you should be forced to zoom in and limit your view distance. I reckon this would not only be more realistic but it would create a bit more tension. 

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24 minutes ago, nazman13 said:

I feel the snow effect is back to front. As you zoom out the snow should have a greater effect on visibility. Whereas in the clip it seemed that the snow got thicker as you zoomed in. 

 

So in snowy conditions you should be forced to zoom in and limit your view distance. I reckon this would not only be more realistic but it would create a bit more tension. 

Big thumbs up on this. 

 

On that note, perhaps the same could be applied to a new heavy rain. I know in the Canadian prairie provinces it can rain enough that you can't see clear across the street, and Muldraugh's average precipitation is much higher than my reference cities.

 

Nothing else to add, except to say that this non-moodle overlay gameplay impact really draws my interest.

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2 hours ago, trombonaught said:

Big thumbs up on this. 

 

Double one plus good for me too

 

I would say don't worry too much about strict adherence to weather patterns.  I think thats great suggestions that the fog should burn off faster in the summer. What I'd like to see is variations of patterns. A couple foggy days, followed by rain, then more fog, to make it seem like weather patterns are moving through.

 

Because society is collapsing you could get smokey days too...

 

 

 

 

 

 

Also, make it sandbox options please, because a silent hill playthrough sounds wicked fun

Edited by thiosk

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I had training at Fort Knox for about a month in October.  It was foggy almost every morning during that time.  When I mentioned it to my instructor one morning, he said that because the area was pretty flat, moisture from the Ohio blankets the area.  The cooling weather drops the dew point, so it's just foggy every morning.  Yeah, as I think about it, my instructor wasn't the happiest guy in the world when it came to being stationed at Knox.  He said it was humid as s*** in the summer, foggy all the time in the fall, cold as balls in the winter, and buggy as all hell in the spring.  Sound like a crappy place, but I'm sure the people that actually live there love it.

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