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So the graphics for this game are awesome, and i've noticed there are a lot of graphics which must have taken a ton of time to make. I am making an Isometric game right now, and it is taking forever to hand-draw every single animation, and direction. Are there any programs or methods that are used to shorten this process?

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Hi DaChucksta, welcome to the forums!

 

TIS are actually switching to a 3D type system to make the walls in the game to actually reduce drawing time and such (and drastically reduce memory too). They've already done this with the character models back in 2012 (wow, that long ago now).

See here for recent developments: http://projectzomboid.com/blog/2013/09/iso-revolution/

and back for the character decisions:http://projectzomboid.com/blog/2012/05/on-the-reanimated-dead/

 

Although for a smaller project 2D, hand drawn is great (usually better looking IMO). Some other forumers can probably give some good advice.

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Hi DaChucksta,

 

You have, essentially, two options: draw all your characters yourself, or render them from 3D software. The first way is the most straight-forward but time consuming depending on how many frames of animations / characters you want. The second way faster for pumping out a lot of animations (assuming you're familiar with 3D software) but complicated if you're striving for good quality at low resolutions.

 

If you're going to draw the characters yourself - and any pixel art animation software would suffice - Pro Motion, for example (http://www.cosmigo.com/promotion/index.php) - there are a couple of things to consider:

 

A character in isometric perspective really ought to be a little top-down (like in pic A, below).

 

post-9-0-50820400-1381400230.png

 

However, for simplicity of drawing and animating, you can get away with it being side / front on (like in pic B. It's less ideal, but because in isometric, vertical walls stay vertical it doesn't stand out too badly and makes animating a hell of a lot easier.

 

As far as walls and floors go... your basic isometric shape should be something nice and neat - the diagonals should be across 2 pixels, by 1 up/down:

 

post-9-0-73060100-1381400491.png

 

Walls in isometric are extremely straight-forward. You can draw the wall as if it were a flat texture, and then just shift every two pixels across up one, and that will then shear the texture into isometric:

 

post-9-0-07286000-1381400971.png

 

Hope this helps :)

post-9-0-50820400-1381400230_thumb.png

post-9-0-73060100-1381400491_thumb.png

post-9-0-07286000-1381400971_thumb.png

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Hi DaChucksta,

 

You have, essentially, two options: draw all your characters yourself, or render them from 3D software. The first way is the most straight-forward but time consuming depending on how many frames of animations / characters you want. The second way faster for pumping out a lot of animations (assuming you're familiar with 3D software) but complicated if you're striving for good quality at low resolutions.

 

If you're going to draw the characters yourself - and any pixel art animation software would suffice - Pro Motion, for example (http://www.cosmigo.com/promotion/index.php) - there are a couple of things to consider:

 

A character in isometric perspective really ought to be a little top-down (like in pic A, below).

 

post-9-0-50820400-1381400230.png

 

However, for simplicity of drawing and animating, you can get away with it being side / front on (like in pic B. It's less ideal, but because in isometric, vertical walls stay vertical it doesn't stand out too badly and makes animating a hell of a lot easier.

 

As far as walls and floors go... your basic isometric shape should be something nice and neat - the diagonals should be across 2 pixels, by 1 up/down:

 

post-9-0-73060100-1381400491.png

 

Walls in isometric are extremely straight-forward. You can draw the wall as if it were a flat texture, and then just shift every two pixels across up one, and that will then shear the texture into isometric:

 

post-9-0-07286000-1381400971.png

 

Hope this helps :)

Alright thanks for the help. I'm going to try the 3D method, so what software should i use for it? I havn't done much 2D drawing, and i've never done 3D drawing, but I'm trying to learn so I don't have to pay a fortune for graphics everytime i make a game.

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As a 3d Program I can highly suggest blender. It is free and there is nothing that can't be done with it:

http://www.blender.org/

Just as an example ... this is a low poly model I have made ages ago using blender.

HeroDude.png

Once the modding tools are out I hope it will be easy to expand the game models with clothes etc.

@Binky: How many polygones do the vanilla models have before you "pixelate" them?

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